LMI For All

Documentation & Development

User Tools

Site Tools


Sidebar

Start Pages

Team Pages

Upcoming Events

Apr 24 Modding Day
data:specsheet_working_futures

Working Futures (Employment (number of persons) and Replacement Demands)

  • Submitted by: Luke Bosworth, l.p.bosworth@warwick.ac.uk
  • Submitted on: 01/04/2016
  • Revision; 4

Data File(s)

This data load contains 2 files, which are as follows:

File Content Size (bytes)
WFDataOcc4Digit-20160303.csv WF Data with 4 Digit Occupation 8,959,510,349
RD-rates75.xlsx Replacement demand expressed as annual per cent rates of base year employment levels. The rates vary by gender, by SMG occupation, by region and by industry 1,426,054

Source Dataset

These data come from Working Futures project, for details see: (link).

Margins of error in Working Futures employment estimates

  1. There is an ongoing tension between the demand for detail and what we can reliably say given the data we have. Users generally would like more detail than can typically be provided based on official data sets that were not designed to provide such detail. The Working Futures employment estimates get around this by generating estimates for all possible combinations and permutations, which are as far as possible consistent with headline figures from the official sources. Complete consistency is not possible because of inconsistencies in the official sources themselves. The main sources underlying Working Futures are the LFS and BRES/ABI. Full details can be found in the Technical Report at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/working-futures-2012-to-2022
  2. In publishing the original Working Futures employment estimates careful detailed caveats are included. These often get forgotten or ignored in subsequent use, including their use in the LMI for All portal. There is no simple way to deal with this. On the one hand we want people to make use of the data. The numbers provided are as robust and meaningful as we can make them. On the other hand there is a danger that too much will be read into them, especially when the focus is on differences between categories or changes over time (when these are not statistically significant or meaningful).
  3. Many of the numbers within the database are based on very small sample sizes and should therefore be used with caution. The edited highlights from the General Guidelines for interpretation in Working Futures (set out below) should be borne in mind by developers using the Working Futures employment data.
  4. Because of the way the data are constructed from a variety of different sources it is not possible to put precise confidence intervals around the point estimates. The guidelines below attempt to fill this gap. Particular care is needed in focusing on differences between categories or changes over time, which as noted below may often not be statistically significant or meaningful.

The following extract is taken from the Working Futures documentation.

General Guidelines to Interpreting Working Futures employment estimates

What can I publish?

This section provides some guidelines to assist in interpreting and utilising the Working Futures historic and forecast data, especially with regard to publication. There are two aspects to this issue – statistical precision or robustness and confidentiality.

Statistical precision/robustness

In Working Futures 2014-2024: General Guidelines and, in further detail, in Working Futures 2014-2024: Technical Report, some guidelines for publication and for unpublished data analysis are suggested. These are based on the degree of precision with which the employment projections can be regarded. First, it should be emphasised that any recommended guidelines for use of the Workbook data can only ever be ‘rules of thumb’, rather than based on robust statistical analysis given the modelling complexity and range of data sources used. The employment estimates make use of a wide variety of sources. As a consequence, it is not possible to calculate precise margins of error even for the historical estimates. From an analysis of previous projections it is clear that the differences between projected employment levels and observed outcomes can be quite large. Industry employment levels are typically projected within ±10 per cent over a 5-10 year horizon. The directions of change are projected correctly in around 90 per cent of cases. The errors in terms of annual percentage growth rates are usually of the same order of magnitude as the observed changes.

Occupational employment levels are typically projected with ±7 per cent over a 5-10 year horizon. The direction of change is correctly projected in about 80 per cent of all cases. Occupational shares are usually projected within ±2 percentage points. (The typical share is around 4 percentage points). Historical revisions to the data account for a very large part of the forecast errors. It is also important to recognise that making predictions in the social sciences is not the same as in science or engineering. A key objective of such projections is often to influence and change behaviour and therefore outcomes. Forecasting accuracy is in this sense a chimera. It is important to appreciate that the purpose of the projections is not to make precise forecasts of employment levels. Rather, the aim is to provide policy analysts and other interested parties with useful information about the general nature of changing employment patterns and their possible implications for skill requirements. Thus, the results provide a useful benchmark for debate and policy deliberations about underlying employment trends. However, they should not be regarded as more precise than the general statements in the text. Many years of international research have demonstrated that detailed manpower planning is not a practicable proposition. The results presented in the workbooks should be regarded as indicative of general trends and orders of magnitude, given the assumptions adopted, rather than precise forecasts of what will necessarily happen. For further details, see the Working Futures 2014-2024: Technical Report. As a general rule of thumb, it is not advisable to publish any statistics or analyses which are not derived from at least 10,000 individuals. This should provide a reasonable degree of statistical robustness to the estimates whether historic or forecast, and also ensure that you are not in breach of the Statistic of Trade Act 1947. For unpublished analyses, a more lenient criterion can be used. However, the uncertainties associated with projections involving fewer than 1,000 individuals are probably too great to make such estimates useful. However, there is inevitably some degree of judgement required on the part of the researcher. ONS recommend using minimum cell sizes of 10,000 (grossed-up) when presenting data based on the LFS. This therefore seems to be a sensible ‘rule of thumb’ to adopt when publishing data from the Workbooks. Given that there are 25 SOC sub-major group occupations to be distinguished in each sector, this suggests a minimum size for a sector of at least 250,000. The sectors chosen as the basis for reporting in Working Futures 2014-2024 meet this criterion. However, users of the Workbooks have access to estimates of employment at a much greater level of detail than this criterion would imply. These have been constructed by using the information that ONS/DfES are prepared to publish, including the raw BRES/ABI data (which are subject to frequent revision). Such estimates can provide useful information and intelligence to users about detailed employment levels and trends. However, some caution is required when using such data and there are strict limitations on what can be published by the user due to concerns about confidentiality (see below). For cases between 1,000 and 10,000 individuals, it is difficult to prescribe general rules, and an element of judgement by the user is needed. At an industry level, and focussing just on employees, the limits set by ONS in publishing BRES/ABI data can be used as a general guide. If ONS do not regard estimates as publishable then the equivalent figures in the workbooks should not be published. Where the focus is on self-employment or on occupations, a more stringent cut-off should be applied. Thus, in summary, we recommend:

  • for PUBLISHED DATA: Ideally, a minimum of 10,000 individuals per cell
  • for UNPUBLISHED DATA: A minimum of 1,000 individuals per cell

Special care is also required regarding publication of any short-term projections. For the reasons discussed in Section 2 of this User Guide, and as explored further in the main Working Futures 2014-2024 report, short-term projections may be especially unreliable and care should be exercised in using them.

Confidentiality

The second aspect is covered by the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Notice under the Statistics of Trade Act 1947. Basically, this requires that details for individual respondents to government surveys cannot be identified from any published information. In terms of the Working Futures Workbooks, the historical basis of the employment forecasts is given by the BRES/ABI data. Thus, in the first instance, users should follow the requirements that the BRES/ABI imposes.

In the main Working Futures 2014-2024: Technical Report Table 12 presents employment data at the 75 detailed industry classification, for full-time and part-time workers in Great Britain. This provides some indication of the sample sizes involved. Self-employment is not collected by the ABI/BRES and is derived from the LFS (see Technical Report for further information).

Most restrictions on publication arise because there are very few establishments in any particular geographical areaP. This means that such establishments could potentially be identified. This is not just a function of employment size. Some of these categories are relatively large in employment terms. In such instances, the small number of establishments involved means that even though they employ quite a large number of people, they can be identified and publication is therefore restricted. In other cases, confidentiality poses no restriction, despite the fact that only a relatively small number are employed, because there are so many tiny establishments involved that this would not identify any particular one. However, in many other cases the estimates are well below the 10,000 limit recommended above and so any information on changes over time or structure within such totals should be regarded only as indicative.

Such estimates may still be suspect on the grounds of statistical reliability. This caveat becomes even more important when the data are extended to cover additional dimensions such as self-employment and occupation. These rely on data from the LFS which are subject to quite large margins of error. Together, these considerations suggest that considerable care needs to be taken with any estimated employment level below 10,000.

Finally, all the estimates presented in the tables within the Workbooks and in the Working Futures reports are rounded to the nearest 1,000. Any estimates of levels or changes below this level should be treated with considerable caution. When focussing on changes over time this may result in some estimates being rounded down to 0 in the tables (more detailed figures can be viewed by clicking the increase decimal points icon on the formatting toolbar in Excel). While such changes may be quite large as a proportion of the starting levels, they should still be treated with considerable caution.

Changes over time

When it comes to changes, many more of the tables now have values which fall below zero when rounded to the nearest thousand. These should be treated with caution. Occupational data, when cross-classified by the regional sectors, also tend to ‘disappear’ when rounded to the nearest thousand. This should be taken as an indication that the estimates are probably subject to quite wide margin of error and should only be used to make broad statements about existing structure or changes over time Only “all industry” estimates of occupational structure will satisfy the 10,000 minimum cell size rule for most local areas. However, the data are probably sufficiently robust to make general statements about the occupational structure within most industries. Thus, for example, although the estimated total employment levels in agriculture may be below 10,000 in all years, the following kinds of statement can be made with reasonable confidence: Occupational structure in Agriculture in the XXXX area follows a similar pattern to that at national level, with most employment concentrated in just 2 occupational groups:

  • Almost 50 per cent are in skilled trades occupations;
  • Around 40 per cent are in other (mainly unskilled) elementary occupations.

The managers & senior officials group used to employ around 1 in 10 workers but this has declined, being offset by growth in the share of personal service occupations. These patterns of change are also broadly in line with those for the UK as a whole. Once again, actual numbers for estimated changes, etc, which are rounded down to below 1,000 should be treated with considerable caution.

Processing

Working Futures employment data for 2 digit occupations have been expanded to 4 digit occupations using data from the Labour Force Survey. This assumes constant fixed shares based on data for 2011 and 2012 combined.

Fields and Columns

WFDataOcc4Digit-20160303.csv

  • year - 2000-2024
  • gender - 2
  • status - 3
  • industry - 75
  • occupation - 369
  • geography - 12
  • qualification - 9
  • weight - Number of people employed

RD-rates75.xlsx

This file contains replacement demand expressed as annual per cent rates of base year employment levels. The rates vary by gender, by SMG occupation, by region and by industry. The rates are in three Excel worksheets, separately for men, women and both. The sheets are labelled and include rates for aggregations of all occupations, all regions and all industry.

Output

The CSV file contains the Working Futures employment data including detail down to 369 SOC 2010 Unit Groups (4-digit level).

Queries and calculations

Expanding 25 SOC 2010 Sub-Major Groups to 369 Unit Groups

The main Working Futures estimates identify employment levels for 25 SOC sub-major groups (SMG). These are expanded to the 369 SOC unit groups, using data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). The proportion for each unit group within the relevant SMG is calculated. The SMGs within the Working Futures employment levels are expanded to 369 unit groups across all other dimensions. The proportions of employment in SOC 4 digit categories within the corresponding SOC 2 digit categories are based on LFS data. These are tabulated in 'SOCconversion.xlsx'.

Fields and Columns - Working Futures Data Specification

The first column is the 'year', which runs from 2000 to 2024.
The second to seventh columns, from 'gender' to 'qualification', are the characteristics of people covered by the dataset.
The last column, 'weight', represents the number of people in the year specified in the first column and with the characteristics in columns two to seven. 'weight' is simply the number of people (or fractions of a person).

Historical estimates at the 4-digit occupational level

Currently there are no reliable historical employment estimates at the 4 digit occupational level. In developing the database historical estimates have been generated, as for the projections, by assuming fixed patterns (shares) within two digit categories, but these are not available via the API. Thus, although the Working Futures 5* database extends from 2000-2024 and covers 369 4 digit occupations throughout, any queries for 4 digit information for years up to and including 2013 should return the response that historical data are not currently available and return the estimate for the corresponding two digit occupation. The rule required is that the API should suppress the data 4 digit information for 2000-2013 so that only 2 digit data would emerge from any request (with a message that the 4 digit data are not available for the historical period prior to 2014).

Examples to be updated. Example 1
Extract predicted employment levels for full-time female plumbers in London in 2018:
year = 2018
gender = 2
occupation = 229
geography = 1
status = 1

The result with these characteristics is: 347.

A query based on these characteristics would return the information required. The other characteristics, status, industry and qualification are also available. A summation across these additional characteristics would give the summary result.

In SQL, an example query:

SELECT year,gender,occupation,geography,weight
FROM [WFDataOcc4Digit-20160303.csv]
WHERE year = 2018 AND gender = 2 AND occupation = 229 AND geography = 1 AND status = 1

Example 2
Extract predicted employment levels for full-time males in the Pharmaceuticals industry in 2024:
year = 2024
gender = 1
industry = 11
status = 1

The result with these characteristics is: 15,230.

A query based on these characteristics would return the information required. The other characteristics, status, industry and qualification are also available. A summation across these additional characteristics would give the summary result.

In SQL, an example query:

SELECT year,gender,occupation,geography,weight
FROM [WFDataOcc4Digit-20160303.csv]
WHERE year = 2015 AND gender = 1 AND industry = 11  AND status = 1

Example 3
Extract predicted employment levels for Self-employed female Dental practitioners in the North West in 2022:
year = 2022
gender = 2
occupation = 62
geography = 8
status = 3

The result with these characteristics is: 1,311.

A query based on these characteristics would return the information required. The other characteristics, status, industry and qualification are also available. A summation across these additional characteristics would give the summary result.

In SQL, an example query:

SELECT year,gender,occupation,geography,weight
FROM [WFDataOcc4Digit-20160303.csv]
WHERE year = 2022 AND gender = 2 AND occupation = 62 AND geography = 8 AND status = 3

Replacement Demand rates: Definitions and source

Defining Replacement demands

Employers need to replace many of their workers who leave due to mortality, retirement, career moves, or other reasons. This so called replacement demand can easily outweigh any losses resulting from structural changes as employment levels rise (or fall). In the Working Futures results replacement demand is around 7 times larger than the net changes projected over the decade from 2014 to 2024. For example the net requirement or total number of job openings, taking replacement demand into account can be more than 13 million compared with an overall increase in employment levels of around 1½ million over a ten year period. Retirements are the principal component in this estimate. It excludes job openings created by people transferring from one occupation to another or other outflows due to migration (some of which will be filled by similar means). The replacement demand module in each of the regional Working Futures workbooks provides replacement demand levels for 25 SMG occupations by industry for men and women separately. The standard period of 2014-2024 has been used for these replacement demand calculations. The same workbooks also provide employment levels for the base year, 2014. Using employment and replacement levels allows aggregation to the 75 industries required for the LMI for All database. Replacement demand is calculated as an annual per cent rate for each of the 75 industries, 25 occupations, regions/countries and by gender.

The rate, as per cent per annum, is calculated from the formula:-

%pa = (Exp(Ln(end year/start year)/period)-1)*100

Where ‘p.a.’ is the required rate
‘Period’ = the number of years over which the calculation is made (10 in this case).
‘start year’ is the employment level in the first year.
‘end year’ is 'start year' + replacement demand.

Using the Replacement Demand rates

These are the data held in the file 'RD-rates75.xlsx'. Replacement demand rates (p.a.) are not available at the 4-digit level. The nearest 2-digit level estimate should be used. Replacement demand rates are supplied for 25 (2 digit) occupations, 75 industries and 12 regions. If that level of detail is not required then rates for all occupations, all regions or all industries should be used. These are included in the file as row or column totals.
The RD rates are in three sheets, one each for Men, Women and the two genders combined. In each case the data are arranged in blocks . Columns D-BZ present estimates of the RD rates for each of the 75 industries. Column C gives a total for All industries. Separate estimates are presented for each region/country in turn. These are in blocks of 25 rows, one for each 2-digit SOC 2010 occupation. This block is followed immediately by a row giving a total RD rate for all occupations. The regional /country blocks cover the 9 English regions, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, followed by all of England, Great Britain (the UK less Northern Ireland) and finally the whole of the UK.

To calculate RDs for any particular employment category from year t to t+n the API:

  1. Extracts the opening employment level for year t (“start year value for employment”);
  2. Applies the closest RD rate available (distinguishing industry, region/country, gender) for the period of years to be covered (n) using the formula:
Replacement demand = (Exp((Ln((p.a./100)+1))*period))*start year value for employment - start year value for employment

where “p.a.” is the value of the RD rate (% per annum) held in the file RD-rates75.xlsx

NOTE that Replacement demand rates (p.a.) are not supplied at the 4-digit level. The nearest available 2-digit estimates are used. Nor are rates differentiated by qualification.

Aggregates are provided for:

  • men and women combined
  • all industries
  • England, Great Britain and the UK

By applying the appropriate rate over a given period an estimate of the replacement demand for that period can be calculated:-

Replacement demand = (Exp((Ln((p.a./100)+1))*period))*start year value for employment - start year value for employment

Or equivalently:

Replacement demand = start year value for employment ((Exp((Ln((p.a./100)+1))*period))- 1)

Where ‘p.a.’ is the appropriate rate.
‘Period’ = the period of years over which the calculation is made.
‘Start year value’ is the employment level in the first year chosen (eg 2014). The period can cover any of the years for which projected employment information is provided (2014-2024).

Rules for suppressing data or raising warning flags

The rules of thumb used are:

  1. If the numbers employed in a particular category / cell (defined by the 12 regions, gender, status, occupation, qualification and industry (75 categories)) are below 1,000 then a query should return “no reliable data available” and offer to go up a level of aggregation across one or more of the main dimensions (e.g. the whole of the UK rather than a region - some aggregation of industries rather than the 75 level, or SOC 2 digit rather than 4 digit). The information on numbers employed is held in the variable 'weight'.
  2. If the numbers employed in a particular category / cell (defined as in 1.) are between 1,000 and 10,000 then a query should return the number but with a flag to say that this estimate is based on a relatively small sample size and if the user requires more robust estimates they should go up a level of aggregation across one or more of the main dimensions (as in 1).

This is done not only for any queries about Employment (including Replacement Demand calculations) but also for Pay and Hours.

In the case of Pay and Hours the API needs to interrogate the part of the database holding the employment numbers to do the checks, as in 1.and 2. above, but then report the corresponding pay or hours values as appropriate.

Rounding of estimates

In order to avoid false impressions of precision the API should round up the estimates before delivering the answer to any query. In the case of the Working Futures employment estimates any number should be rounded to the nearest thousand.

Classifications and aggregations

This section summarises the categories used and more aggregate groupings to be adopted if data are unreliable at the more detailed level.

Industries

Aggregation SIC Division to 75 Industries

Ind75 Ind75 name Ind22 Ind22 name Ind6 Ind6 name
1 Agriculture, etc [01-03] 1 Agriculture [01-03] 1 Primary sector and utilities [01-09,35-39]
2 Coal, oil & gas; Mining & related [05-09] 2 Mining and quarrying [05-09] 1
3 Food products [10] 3 Food drink and tobacco [10-12] 2 Manufacturing [10-33]
4 Beverages and tobacco [11-12] 3 2
5 Textiles [13] 5 Rest of manufacturing [13-25,29-33] 2
6 Wearing apparel; Leather, etc [14,15] 5 2
7 Wood and cork [16] 5 2
8 Paper, etc [17] 5 2
9 Printing and recording [18] 5 2
10 Coke and petroleum; Chemicals, etc [19,20] 5 2
11 Pharmaceuticals [21] 5 2
12 Rubber and plastic [22] 5 2
13 Other non-metallic [23] 5 2
14 Basic metals [24] 5 2
15 Metal products [25] 5 2
16 Computer, etc [26] 4 Engineering [26-28] 2
17 Electrical equipment [27] 4 2
18 Machinery n.e.c. [28] 4 2
19 Motor vehicles, etc [29] 5 Rest of manufacturing [13-25,29-33] 2
20 Other transport equipment [30] 5 2
21 Furniture [31] 5 2
22 Other manufacturing [32] 5 2
23 Repair and installation [33] 5 2
24 Electricity, gas, etc [35] 6 Electricity and gas [35] 1 Primary sector and utilities [01-09,35-39]
25 Water [36] 7 Water and sewerage [36-39] 1
26 Sewerage [37] 7 1
27 Waste management [38-39] 7 1
28 Construction [41] 8 Construction [41-43] 3 Construction [41-43]
29 Civil engineering [42] 8 3
30 Specialised construction [43] 8 3
31 Motor vehicle trade [45] 9 Wholesale and retail trade [45-47] 4 Trade, accomod. and transport [45-56]
32 Wholesale trade [46] 9 4
33 Retail trade [47] 9 4
34 Land transport, etc [49] 10 Transport and storage [49-53] 4
35 Water transport [50] 10 4
36 Air transport [51] 10 4
37 Warehousing, etc [52] 10 4
38 Postal and courier [53] 10 4
39 Accommodation [55] 11 Accommodation and food [55-56] 4
40 Food and beverage services [56] 11 4
41 Publishing activities [58] 12 Media [58-60] 5 Business and other services [58-82,90-99]
42 Film and music [59] 12 5
43 Broadcasting [60] 12 5
44 Telecommunications [61] 13 Information technology [61-63] 5
45 Computing services [62] 13 5
46 Information services [63] 13 5
47 Financial services [64] 14 Finance and insurance [64-66] 5
48 Insurance and pensions [65] 14 5
49 Auxiliary financial services [66] 14 5
50 Real estate [68] 15 Real estate [68] 5
51 Legal and accounting [69] 16 Professional services [69-75] 5
52 Head offices, etc [70] 16 5
53 Architectural and related [71] 16 5
54 Scientific research and development [72] 16 5
55 Advertising, etc [73] 16 5
56 Other professional [74] 16 5
57 Veterinary [75] 16 5
58 Rental and leasing [77] 17 Support services [77-82] 5
59 Employment activities [78] 17 5
60 Travel, etc [79] 17 5
61 Security, etc [80] 17 5
62 Services to buildings [81] 17 5
63 Office administrative [82] 17 5
64 Public administration and defence [84] 18 Public admin. and defence [84] 6 Non-market services [84-88]
65 Education [85] 19 Education [85] 6
66 Health [86] 20 Health and social work [86-88] 6
67 Residential care [87] 20 6
68 Social work [88] 20 6
69 Arts and entertainment [90] 21 Arts and entertainment [90-93] 5 Business and other services [58-82,90-99]
70 Libraries, etc [91] 21 5
71 Gambling and betting [92] 21 5
72 Sport and recreation [93] 21 5
73 Membership organisations [94] 22 Other services [94-96] 5
74 Repair of goods [95] 22 5
75 Other personal service [96-99] 22 5

Occupations

Occ(369)Occ(369) NameOcc(25)Occ(25) Name
1 1115 Chief executives and senior officials 1 11 CORPORATE MANAGERS AND DIRECTORS
2 1116 Elected officers and representatives 1
3 1121 Production managers and directors in manufacturing 1
4 1122 Production managers and directors in construction 1
5 1123 Production managers and directors in mining and energy 1
6 1131 Financial managers and directors 1
7 1132 Marketing and sales directors 1
8 1133 Purchasing managers and directors 1
9 1134 Advertising and public relations directors 1
10 1135 Human resource managers and directors 1
11 1136 Information technology and telecommunications directors 1
12 1139 Functional managers and directors nec 1
13 1150 Financial institution managers and directors 1
14 1161 Managers and directors in transport and distribution 1
15 1162 Managers and directors in storage and warehousing 1
16 1171 Officers in armed forces 1
17 1172 Senior police officers 1
18 1173 Senior officers in fire, ambulance, prison and related services 1
19 1181 Health services and public health managers and directors 1
20 1184 Social services managers and directors 1
21 1190 Managers and directors in retail and wholesale 1
22 1211 Managers and proprietors in agriculture and horticulture 2 12 OTHER MANAGERS AND PROPRIETORS
23 1213 Managers and proprietors in forestry, fishing and related services 2
24 1221 Hotel and accommodation managers and proprietors 2
25 1223 Restaurant and catering establishment managers and proprietors 2
26 1224 Publicans and managers of licensed premises 2
27 1225 Leisure and sports managers 2
28 1226 Travel agency managers and proprietors 2
29 1241 Health care practice managers 2
30 1242 Residential, day and domiciliary care managers and proprietors 2
31 1251 Property, housing and estate managers 2
32 1252 Garage managers and proprietors 2
33 1253 Hairdressing and beauty salon managers and proprietors 2
34 1254 Shopkeepers and proprietors wholesale and retail 2
35 1255 Waste disposal and environmental services managers 2
36 1259 Managers and proprietors in other services nec 2
37 2111 Chemical scientists 3 21 SCIENCE, RESEARCH, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONALS
38 2112 Biological scientists and biochemists 3
39 2113 Physical scientists 3
40 2114 Social and humanities scientists 3
41 2119 Natural and social science professionals nec 3
42 2121 Civil engineers 3
43 2122 Mechanical engineers 3
44 2123 Electrical engineers 3
45 2124 Electronics engineers 3
46 2126 Design and development engineers 3
47 2127 Production and process engineers 3
48 2129 Engineering professionals nec 3
49 2133 IT specialist managers 3
50 2134 IT project and programme managers 3
51 2135 IT business analysts, architects and systems designers 3
52 2136 Programmers and software development professionals 3
53 2137 Web design and development professionals 3
54 2139 Information technology and telecommunications professionals nec 3
55 2141 Conservation professionals 3
56 2142 Environment professionals 3
57 2150 Research and development managers 3
58 2211 Medical practitioners 4 22 HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
59 2212 Psychologists 4
60 2213 Pharmacists 4
61 2214 Ophthalmic opticians 4
62 2215 Dental practitioners 4
63 2216 Veterinarians 4
64 2217 Medical radiographers 4
65 2218 Podiatrists 4
66 2219 Health professionals nec 4
67 2221 Physiotherapists 4
68 2222 Occupational therapists 4
69 2223 Speech and language therapists 4
70 2229 Therapy professionals nec 4
71 2231 Nurses 4
72 2232 Midwives 4
73 2311 Higher education teaching professionals 5 23 TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL PROFESSIONALS
74 2312 Further education teaching professionals 5
75 2314 Secondary education teaching professionals 5
76 2315 Primary and nursery education teaching professionals 5
77 2316 Special needs education teaching professionals 5
78 2317 Senior professionals of educational establishments 5
79 2318 Education advisers and school inspectors 5
80 2319 Teaching and other educational professionals nec 5
81 2412 Barristers and judges 6 24 BUSINESS, MEDIA AND PUBLIC SERVICE PROFESSIONALS
82 2413 Solicitors 6
83 2419 Legal professionals nec 6
84 2421 Chartered and certified accountants 6
85 2423 Management consultants and business analysts 6
86 2424 Business and financial project management professionals 6
87 2425 Actuaries, economists and statisticians 6
88 2426 Business and related research professionals 6
89 2429 Business, research and administrative professionals nec 6
90 2431 Architects 6
91 2432 Town planning officers 6
92 2433 Quantity surveyors 6
93 2434 Chartered surveyors 6
94 2435 Chartered architectural technologists 6
95 2436 Construction project managers and related professionals 6
96 2442 Social workers 6
97 2443 Probation officers 6
98 2444 Clergy 6
99 2449 Welfare professionals nec 6
100 2451 Librarians 6
101 2452 Archivists and curators 6
102 2461 Quality control and planning engineers 6
103 2462 Quality assurance and regulatory professionals 6
104 2463 Environmental health professionals 6
105 2471 Journalists, newspaper and periodical editors 6
106 2472 Public relations professionals 6
107 2473 Advertising accounts managers and creative directors 6
108 3111 Laboratory technicians 7 31 SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS
109 3112 Electrical and electronics technicians 7
110 3113 Engineering technicians 7
111 3114 Building and civil engineering technicians 7
112 3115 Quality assurance technicians 7
113 3116 Planning, process and production technicians 7
114 3119 Science, engineering and production technicians nec 7
115 3121 Architectural and town planning technicians 7
116 3122 Draughtspersons 7
117 3131 IT operations technicians 7
118 3132 IT user support technicians 7
119 3213 Paramedics 8 32 HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS
120 3216 Dispensing opticians 8
121 3217 Pharmaceutical technicians 8
122 3218 Medical and dental technicians 8
123 3219 Health associate professionals nec 8
124 3231 Youth and community workers 8
125 3233 Child and early years officers 8
126 3234 Housing officers 8
127 3235 Counsellors 8
128 3239 Welfare and housing associate professionals nec 8
129 3311 NCOs and other ranks 9 33 PROTECTIVE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
130 3312 Police officers (sergeant and below) 9
131 3313 Fire service officers (watch manager and below) 9
132 3314 Prison service officers (below principal officer) 9
133 3315 Police community support officers 9
134 3319 Protective service associate professionals nec 9
135 3411 Artists 10 34 CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORTS OCCUPATIONS
136 3412 Authors, writers and translators 10
137 3413 Actors, entertainers and presenters 10
138 3414 Dancers and choreographers 10
139 3415 Musicians 10
140 3416 Arts officers, producers and directors 10
141 3417 Photographers, audio-visual and broadcasting equipment operators 10
142 3421 Graphic designers 10
143 3422 Product, clothing and related designers 10
144 3441 Sports players 10
145 3442 Sports coaches, instructors and officials 10
146 3443 Fitness instructors 10
147 3511 Air traffic controllers 11 35 BUSINESS AND PUBLIC SERVICE ASSOCIATE PROFESSIONALS
148 3512 Aircraft pilots and flight engineers 11
149 3513 Ship and hovercraft officers 11
150 3520 Legal associate professionals 11
151 3531 Estimators, valuers and assessors 11
152 3532 Brokers 11
153 3533 Insurance underwriters 11
154 3534 Finance and investment analysts and advisers 11
155 3535 Taxation experts 11
156 3536 Importers and exporters 11
157 3537 Financial and accounting technicians 11
158 3538 Financial accounts managers 11
159 3539 Business and related associate professionals nec 11
160 3541 Buyers and procurement officers 11
161 3542 Business sales executives 11
162 3543 Marketing associate professionals 11
163 3544 Estate agents and auctioneers 11
164 3545 Sales accounts and business development managers 11
165 3546 Conference and exhibition managers and organisers 11
166 3550 Conservation and environmental associate professionals 11
167 3561 Public services associate professionals 11
168 3562 Human resources and industrial relations officers 11
169 3563 Vocational and industrial trainers and instructors 11
170 3564 Careers advisers and vocational guidance specialists 11
171 3565 Inspectors of standards and regulations 11
172 3567 Health and safety officers 11
173 4112 National government administrative occupations 12 41 ADMINISTRATIVE OCCUPATIONS
174 4113 Local government administrative occupations 12
175 4114 Officers of non-governmental organisations 12
176 4121 Credit controllers 12
177 4122 Book-keepers, payroll managers and wages clerks 12
178 4123 Bank and post office clerks 12
179 4124 Finance officers 12
180 4129 Financial administrative occupations nec 12
181 4131 Records clerks and assistants 12
182 4132 Pensions and insurance clerks and assistants 12
183 4133 Stock control clerks and assistants 12
184 4134 Transport and distribution clerks and assistants 12
185 4135 Library clerks and assistants 12
186 4138 Human resources administrative occupations 12
187 4151 Sales administrators 12
188 4159 Other administrative occupations nec 12
189 4161 Office managers 12
190 4162 Office supervisors 12
191 4211 Medical secretaries 13 42 SECRETARIAL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS
192 4212 Legal secretaries 13
193 4213 School secretaries 13
194 4214 Company secretaries 13
195 4215 Personal assistants and other secretaries 13
196 4216 Receptionists 13
197 4217 Typists and related keyboard occupations 13
198 5111 Farmers 14 51 SKILLED AGRICULTURAL AND RELATED TRADES
199 5112 Horticultural trades 14
200 5113 Gardeners and landscape gardeners 14
201 5114 Groundsmen and greenkeepers 14
202 5119 Agricultural and fishing trades nec 14
203 5211 Smiths and forge workers 15 52 SKILLED METAL, ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC TRADES
204 5212 Moulders, core makers and die casters 15
205 5213 Sheet metal workers 15
206 5214 Metal plate workers, and riveters 15
207 5215 Welding trades 15
208 5216 Pipe fitters 15
209 5221 Metal machining setters and setter-operators 15
210 5222 Tool makers, tool fitters and markers-out 15
211 5223 Metal working production and maintenance fitters 15
212 5224 Precision instrument makers and repairers 15
213 5225 Air-conditioning and refrigeration engineers 15
214 5231 Vehicle technicians, mechanics and electricians 15
215 5232 Vehicle body builders and repairers 15
216 5234 Vehicle paint technicians 15
217 5235 Aircraft maintenance and related trades 15
218 5236 Boat and ship builders and repairers 15
219 5237 Rail and rolling stock builders and repairers 15
220 5241 Electricians and electrical fitters 15
221 5242 Telecommunications engineers 15
222 5244 TV, video and audio engineers 15
223 5245 IT engineers 15
224 5249 Electrical and electronic trades nec 15
225 5250 Skilled metal, electrical and electronic trades supervisors 15
226 5311 Steel erectors 16 53 SKILLED CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING TRADES
227 5312 Bricklayers and masons 16
228 5313 Roofers, roof tilers and slaters 16
229 5314 Plumbers and heating and ventilating engineers 16
230 5315 Carpenters and joiners 16
231 5316 Glaziers, window fabricators and fitters 16
232 5319 Construction and building trades nec 16
233 5321 Plasterers 16
234 5322 Floorers and wall tilers 16
235 5323 Painters and decorators 16
236 5330 Construction and building trades supervisors 16
237 5411 Weavers and knitters 17 54 TEXTILES, PRINTING AND OTHER SKILLED TRADES
238 5412 Upholsterers 17
239 5413 Footwear and leather working trades 17
240 5414 Tailors and dressmakers 17
241 5419 Textiles, garments and related trades nec 17
242 5421 Pre-press technicians 17
243 5422 Printers 17
244 5423 Print finishing and binding workers 17
245 5431 Butchers 17
246 5432 Bakers and flour confectioners 17
247 5433 Fishmongers and poultry dressers 17
248 5434 Chefs 17
249 5435 Cooks 17
250 5436 Catering and bar managers 17
251 5441 Glass and ceramics makers, decorators and finishers 17
252 5442 Furniture makers and other craft woodworkers 17
253 5443 Florists 17
254 5449 Other skilled trades nec 17
255 6121 Nursery nurses and assistants 18 61 CARING PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
256 6122 Childminders and related occupations 18
257 6123 Playworkers 18
258 6125 Teaching assistants 18
259 6126 Educational support assistants 18
260 6131 Veterinary nurses 18
261 6132 Pest control officers 18
262 6139 Animal care services occupations nec 18
263 6141 Nursing auxiliaries and assistants 18
264 6142 Ambulance staff (excluding paramedics) 18
265 6143 Dental nurses 18
266 6144 Houseparents and residential wardens 18
267 6145 Care workers and home carers 18
268 6146 Senior care workers 18
269 6147 Care escorts 18
270 6148 Undertakers, mortuary and crematorium assistants 18
271 6211 Sports and leisure assistants 19 62 LEISURE, TRAVEL AND RELATED PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
272 6212 Travel agents 19
273 6214 Air travel assistants 19
274 6215 Rail travel assistants 19
275 6219 Leisure and travel service occupations nec 19
276 6221 Hairdressers and barbers 19
277 6222 Beauticians and related occupations 19
278 6231 Housekeepers and related occupations 19
279 6232 Caretakers 19
280 6240 Cleaning and housekeeping managers and supervisors 19
281 7111 Sales and retail assistants 20 71 SALES OCCUPATIONS
282 7112 Retail cashiers and check-out operators 20
283 7113 Telephone salespersons 20
284 7114 Pharmacy and other dispensing assistants 20
285 7115 Vehicle and parts salespersons and advisers 20
286 7121 Collector salespersons and credit agents 20
287 7122 Debt, rent and other cash collectors 20
288 7123 Roundspersons and van salespersons 20
289 7124 Market and street traders and assistants 20
290 7125 Merchandisers and window dressers 20
291 7129 Sales related occupations nec 20
292 7130 Sales supervisors 20
293 7211 Call and contact centre occupations 21 72 CUSTOMER SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
294 7213 Telephonists 21
295 7214 Communication operators 21
296 7215 Market research interviewers 21
297 7219 Customer service occupations nec 21
298 7220 Customer service managers and supervisors 21
299 8111 Food, drink and tobacco process operatives 22 81 PROCESS, PLANT AND MACHINE OPERATIVES
300 8112 Glass and ceramics process operatives 22
301 8113 Textile process operatives 22
302 8114 Chemical and related process operatives 22
303 8115 Rubber process operatives 22
304 8116 Plastics process operatives 22
305 8117 Metal making and treating process operatives 22
306 8118 Electroplaters 22
307 8119 Process operatives nec 22
308 8121 Paper and wood machine operatives 22
309 8122 Coal mine operatives 22
310 8123 Quarry workers and related operatives 22
311 8124 Energy plant operatives 22
312 8125 Metal working machine operatives 22
313 8126 Water and sewerage plant operatives 22
314 8127 Printing machine assistants 22
315 8129 Plant and machine operatives nec 22
316 8131 Assemblers (electrical and electronic products) 22
317 8132 Assemblers (vehicles and metal goods) 22
318 8133 Routine inspectors and testers 22
319 8134 Weighers, graders and sorters 22
320 8135 Tyre, exhaust and windscreen fitters 22
321 8137 Sewing machinists 22
322 8139 Assemblers and routine operatives nec 22
323 8141 Scaffolders, stagers and riggers 22
324 8142 Road construction operatives 22
325 8143 Rail construction and maintenance operatives 22
326 8149 Construction operatives nec 22
327 8211 Large goods vehicle drivers 23 82 TRANSPORT AND MOBILE MACHINE DRIVERS AND OPERATIVES
328 8212 Van drivers 23
329 8213 Bus and coach drivers 23
330 8214 Taxi and cab drivers and chauffeurs 23
331 8215 Driving instructors 23
332 8221 Crane drivers 23
333 8222 Fork-lift truck drivers 23
334 8223 Agricultural machinery drivers 23
335 8229 Mobile machine drivers and operatives nec 23
336 8231 Train and tram drivers 23
337 8232 Marine and waterways transport operatives 23
338 8233 Air transport operatives 23
339 8234 Rail transport operatives 23
340 8239 Other drivers and transport operatives nec 23
341 9111 Farm workers 24 91 ELEMENTARY TRADES AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS
342 9112 Forestry workers 24
343 9119 Fishing and other elementary agriculture occupations nec 24
344 9120 Elementary construction occupations 24
345 9132 Industrial cleaning process occupations 24
346 9134 Packers, bottlers, canners and fillers 24
347 9139 Elementary process plant occupations nec 24
348 9211 Postal workers, mail sorters, messengers and couriers 25 92 ELEMENTARY ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS
349 9219 Elementary administration occupations nec 25
350 9231 Window cleaners 25
351 9232 Street cleaners 25
352 9233 Cleaners and domestics 25
353 9234 Launderers, dry cleaners and pressers 25
354 9235 Refuse and salvage occupations 25
355 9236 Vehicle valeters and cleaners 25
356 9239 Elementary cleaning occupations nec 25
357 9241 Security guards and related occupations 25
358 9242 Parking and civil enforcement occupations 25
359 9244 School midday and crossing patrol occupations 25
360 9249 Elementary security occupations nec 25
361 9251 Shelf fillers 25
362 9259 Elementary sales occupations nec 25
363 9260 Elementary storage occupations 25
364 9271 Hospital porters 25
365 9272 Kitchen and catering assistants 25
366 9273 Waiters and waitresses 25
367 9274 Bar staff 25
368 9275 Leisure and theme park attendants 25
369 9279 Other elementary services occupations nec 25

Region

idGovernment Office Region (standard ordering)
1 London
2 South East
3 East of England
4 South West
5 West Midlands
6 East Midlands
7 Yorks & the Humber
8 North West
9 North East
10 Wales
11 Scotland
12 Northern Ireland

Qualification

Employment is classified into 9 broad qualification categories and 6 aggregated qualification groups:

id QCF id QCF aggregated
1 QCF8 Doctorate 1 QCF 7-8 Higher degree
2 QCF7 Other higher degree
3 QCF6 First degree 2 QCF 4-6 First degree & other HE
4 QCF5 Foundation degree;Nursing;Teaching
5 QCF4 HE below degree level
6 QCF3 A level & equivalent 3 QCF 3 A level & equivalent
7 QCF2 GCSE(A-C) & equivalent 4 QCF 2 GCSE(A-C) & equivalent
8 QCF1 GCSE(below grade C) & equivalent 5 QCF 1 GCSE(below grade C) & equivalent
9 No qualification 6 No qualification

Closing Notes

data/specsheet_working_futures.txt · Last modified: 2016-09-26 22:19 by Luke Bosworth